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1 review | 4 people love this record: be the 5th! It is my belief that “Transmissions From The Satellite Heart” is the first great Flaming Lips album. Being a daft, lanky 19 year old when this came out, the silliness of “She Don’t Use Jelly” appealed greatly, and whilst it is somewhat of a novelty song, I still like it ... »

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Transmissions From The Satellite Heart by The Flaming Lips
1 review. Add your own review.
4 people love this record. Be the 5th!

9/10 Penrith Steve Customer review, 28th October 2014

It is my belief that “Transmissions From The Satellite Heart” is the first great Flaming Lips album. Being a daft, lanky 19 year old when this came out, the silliness of “She Don’t Use Jelly” appealed greatly, and whilst it is somewhat of a novelty song, I still like it. There are far better songs on here though. “Turn It On” which opens the album is a fabulously simple and melodic anthem. “Pilot Can At The Queer Of God” is their own special brand of twisted space pop. “Oh My Pregnant Head” is a strange ballad with the refrain of “Labia in the sunlight” repeated in a not dissimilar way to “the sun machine is coming down and we’re going to have a party” on Bowie’s “Memory of a Free Festival”. The acoustic “Chewin’ The Apple Of Your Eye” is sung in a style fairly typical of Wayne Coyne’s stretched vocal with scratchy effect to make it sound like an old record being played. Anthemic space pop returns on “Superhumans” and “Be my Head” harks back to the “In A Priest Drive Ambulance” days. My favourite track is probably “Moth In The Incubator” which starts acoustically and builds to a chorus of “So embryonic it’s all right, I’ve been born before I’m getting used to it, brain dead is always how it ends” ending with a manic slide guitar. There is a cover on here too, “Plastic Jesus” which was sung by Paul Newman in “Cool Hand Luke”. “Slow Nerve Action” closes the album with big, dirty, stomping drums and a guitar riff that sounds like a fat worm trying to talk.


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