Daughters Of The Sky by Bamboo

Third studio album from Bamboo, the project formed by Peepholes’ Nick Carlisle and Trash Kit’s Rachel Horwood. Taking inspiration from the florid beauty of classic folk and the pristine ambient productions of Berlin-era Bowie, Daughters of the Sky is thematically underpinned by motherhood and nature. 

Limited Vinyl LP £16.99 UTR114LP

180g gold coloured vinyl, gatefold LP on Upset The Rhythm. Edition of 500 copies.

  • Coloured vinyl
  • Limited edition
This item needs to be ordered in from a supplier. Currently ships in 7 days but delays are possible.

Limited CD £11.99 UTR114CD

CD on Upset The Rhythm. Edition of 500 copies.

  • Limited edition
This item needs to be ordered in from a supplier. Currently ships in 7 days but delays are possible.

REVIEWS

Daughters Of The Sky by Bamboo
1 review. Write a review for us »
7/10 Jamie 20 June 2019

Bamboo are apparently Peepholes’ Nick Carlisle (synths, production) and Trash Kit’s Rachel Horwood (vocals, electric banjo!). Daughters Of The Sky is their third album together. So far it’s all sounding like very nice, polished, gently melodic synth-pop. Coming across a bit like Chew Lips (anyone remember them?) only less insistent and more layered. That’s not to say their sound is cluttered, but it’s quite a ‘busy’ sound. Rachel’s voice floats effortlessly in a sort of pseudo-folky but slightly disconnected way. It’s that indifferent vocal sound which suits the icy, super-shiny veneer of Carlisle’s synths. Those synths, by the way, have been described in the press release as ‘pristine’, so beware! The fetishisation of Tony Visconti’s late ‘70s Bowie-era productions continues apace.

The title track is lovely: vocal harmonies and electronic melodies evoking a bit of the ol’ Stereolab with that Berlin Bowie cool sheen providing the cherry on top.. And of course, reflecting the band’s chosen name and preoccupation with the East, some Sylvian / Japan vibes coming through with the glockenspiel and / or xylophone making it feel a bit more -- for want of a better word -- exotic. They’re quite big on the mystic atmospheres are these two. Airy, New-Agey synths and pads with a dollop of reverb make a magic carpet for Rachel to weave her wafting voice into. That effect is particularly to the fore on ‘East Of The Sun / West Of The Moon’. Yeah, a bit contrived definitely but also quite a nice listening experience.




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