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Sally Dige, a poet, musician, visual artist and filmmaker recorded Holding On with one synth and her voice. She has layered sound upon sound, using at least 100 audio tracks for each piece. Sally was going through a rough time during the album’s conception, but poured every ounce of her pain and confusion into the production.The result is an interesting juxtaposition of dance songs about loneliness and death. LP on Avant.

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Holding On by Sally Dige 1 review. Add your own review. 8/10
1 person loves this record. Be the 2nd!

8/10 Staff review, 01 November 2017

The lead comment on the Bandcamp page for this record reads ‘listened to it while slacking off at work, a time well spent’. Buddy… same. I feel like Sally Dige’s record of screeching synth-pop theatrics could appeal to anyone from the biggest video game enthusiast to the most diehardin’ fan of The Breakfast Club. An antiquated slice of pop music in which Dige’s electronics screech out, in which her drum machines pummel in synthetic space, and in which she murmurs at peak volume… what was I going to end this sentence with? I’m very caught up in this thing right now.

Dige’s last record, ‘Hard to Please’, took in strands of Italo disco and traditional ‘80s pop, offering sparkle-toned music matched with dramatic monotone. Here that continues, with tracks offering the passionate apathy of New Order (on the surface -- there’s much more going on, in reality). The record doesn’t sound busy, but it’s full of its theatrics: Dige reportedly used over 100 tracks on these tunes, sometimes quoting that number just for the amount of drums tracked -- it makes sense for a tune like “Be Gone”, where the melodies are clear but in which the textures feel like massive stacks, like we’ve hit capacity and then blown way over it.

I’m hesitant to keep comparing to your fave throwbacks: Dige has gone far, far deeper than the aesthetics she’s citing, creating endless layers of synth pop to delve through. She keeps the chaos at bay by singing super simple and furiously emotive lines, giving a tune like “This Life” a centre to its endlessly rippling surface. Dance to detail.


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