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1 review | 4 people love this record: be the 5th! New! From the Collapsing Market label, this album represents a recently-discovered dusty old tape; Tchashm-e-Del celebrates the artefact’s unearthing from a Paris flat. Cyrus Goberville was digging through stuff at home and found his grandfather’s 1960s recording of an Iranian radio play, the lucky lucky man. The music on this record was masterminded by Morteza Hannaneh, co-founder of ... »
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  • LP £14.99
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  • CLPMR003
  • CLPMR003 / LP on Collapsing Market. Edition of 500 copies

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Tchashm-e-Del by Morteza Hannaneh
1 review. Add your own review.
4 people love this record. Be the 5th!
8/10 Jamie Staff review, 26 June 2017

New! From the Collapsing Market label, this album represents a recently-discovered dusty old tape; Tchashm-e-Del celebrates the artefact’s unearthing from a Paris flat. Cyrus Goberville was digging through stuff at home and found his grandfather’s 1960s recording of an Iranian radio play, the lucky lucky man.

The music on this record was masterminded by Morteza Hannaneh, co-founder of the Tehran Symphony Orchestra, we know not exactly when. Careful restoration from the original tape reels has revealed some truly astonishingly ravishing music set to a Ghazal, an ancient Arabic ode. Partly spoken (attractively softly) and partly sung (plaintively, by a man with an amazing voice), the poetry written by Hatef Esfehani in the 18th century is set here to some beautifully orchestrated strings, romantically trilling Arabic flutes of bamboo and wood and the most gorgeous choral sections. It is, after all, a love story in the most classical of forms belonging to a tradition stretching as far back as at least the 10th century AD.

It’s the kind of thing you might have expected to turn up on Smithsonian Folkways. A worthwhile endeavour, then, and certainly worthy of your attention… If you appreciate beautiful music. Even for newcomers to traditional and non-Western musics.


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