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It’s definitely the time of the decade for lo-fi, bedroom-recorded, four-track, hyphen-loaded psych-rock records, but we still think you should give Art Feynman’s debut album a spin. Loaded with afrobeats, harmonic ninths, and shredding guitar solos, Blast Off Through the Wicker basically sounds like Mac DeMarco and Ebo Taylor’s lovechild. Which is great.


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  • CD £11.49
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REVIEWS

Blast Off Through The Wicker by Art Feynman
1 review. Add your own review.
4 people love this record. Be the 5th!
7/10 Clinton Staff review, 18 July 2017

Literally everything is made in the bedroom these days. Understandable  - the technology is there and no-one has any money. This is fine but it's no good to just make bedroom recordings and thinking that is enough to cut through. Luckily Art Feynman disarms with the first two tracks here which guide me gently into his world. He makes a kind of rhythmic lo-fi pop concoction that suggests serious time listening to both Arthur Russell and William Onyeabor.

But Feynman has previous. His name is actually Luke Temple and he was in Here we Go Magic. A band who, in fits and starts, made some great music. So good in fact that it made you wonder why other parts of their catalogue is so...um...so-so. Here he eschews lo-fi racket for a subtler approach that is based around tight knit percussive compositions rather than your usual guitar led bargain basement rock. On 'Can't Stand It' the elements of dub, reggae and soul are most obvious and Art's voice slinks over sounding more like a '70's reggae singer and even though the splintered clattery production has elements of Ariel Pink I'd place this more in the zone of those rock bands such as the Bees who are unafraid to meld indie based sounds with more esoteric influences. For here elements of afrobeat, funk, Nigerian music and krauty synth can be heard.

On the simple, stark but beautiful 'Win Win' he is Arthur Russell but this is a fine example of producing worldly sounds from ones home lair.      




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