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Slowcore is a genre that divides many. Mixing shoegaze, doom and emo to an almost decadent level of gloominess, the pace is that of Bohren Und Der Club Of Gore, detuned and incredibly heavy until it becomes a wash of reverb and glittered minor harmonies. Thom Wasluck’s Planning For Funeral exemplifies this genre and returns with his third full length, vinyl and CD on Flenser.


  • LP £19.49
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  • CD £12.99
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REVIEWS

Below The House by Planning For Burial
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3 people love this record. Be the 4th!
8/10 Robin Staff review, 14 July 2017

Thom Wasluck’s music exists at a crossroads. Between extreme metal and shoegaze, bounded by fury and vulnerability… containing feedback and glockenspiels. You can’t make that happen easy, but his sound as Planning for Burial creates a new kind of emo melancholy -- a kind that is confessional almost entirely through atmosphere.

Slowed to the pace of a gloomy winter of tenacious snowfall, ‘Below the House’ becomes a beautiful endurance test, its doomy crescendos, muffled vocal desparations and distorted crunch combining for some of the most devastating music Wasluck has ever made. The black metal swirl of “Somewhere in the Evening” combines with a furious breakdown as dissonance squeals its way out of the march, with small, bedroom pop keys playing distantly before piano chords roll credits. It’s a reminder of the Planning for Burial’s economical approach to sourcing something epic -- this music usually reverts to a homeliness you might not expect it to have in its grandest moments.

It’s probably his best structured record yet, too: coasting by on ambient segues that appear to reference the record’s phrasings, he makes “(Something)” sound like new-found nostalgia we can share in. The two-parter “Dull Knife” traverses slowcore, post-rock and the scuzzy metal ruins that Nadja might make on a better day. ‘Below the House’ is the kinda record where every chord sees to ring out with its own purpose; it’s a fine thing when you can make a record this melancholy sound so versatile.


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