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Twine is the second instalment in Marcus Fischer’s collaboration with Taylor Deupree. It’s a pretty minimal creature, with the backbone of the music formed from just 2 manipulated tape loops, then augmented with acoustic instruments. Subtle sonics that put the listener right there in the studio with Deupree and Fischer: an impressively effective little set. On 12k.


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  • Twine by Taylor Deupree & Marcus Fischer

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Twine by Taylor Deupree & Marcus Fischer
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7 people love this record. Be the 8th!
8/10 Robin Staff review, 13 June 2016

Sometimes you read an ambient album backstory so cliched it feels reverse engineered. Taylor Deupree and Marcus Fischer made their debut collaboration in just a few days hauled up from a “snow-covered New York”, as if inviting the cold weather to be a part of their quietly whirring tape loops. This follow-up is construed from a tape loop the duo were flirting with while relaxing together in the summer, suggesting a warmer and altogether richer sound. If you’re just about to absent-mindedly type “ambient music” into the search bar of BBC Weather, I absolutely do not blame you.

Just two mono tape loops beat the heart of ‘Twine’, acting as the humble starting point that gets these two artists hyped; it’s the way they choose to access them that makes the record special. A lot of it is to do with the grainy production, with a constant, weather-beaten hiss arching over the record, along with recorded fumblings and bumpy resets. But the record is augmented with other things too: acoustic instruments and xylophonic tingles make brief but repeated appearances, such as the string pluck of “Bell”, which sounds inviting but immediately absent, like only hearing the first note of a beautiful melody. Generally, any sourced sound will end up the same way: a loop, a fragment, a possible development circling back on itself. Deupree and Fischer like sounds that flicker.

Lovely, simple and soft, this record invokes very basic pleasures of ambient music, and is all the better for it. It doesn’t rise and fall or swell poignantly, instead sounding much like any of Deupree’s warm drone meanderings. Think Danny Clay and his formless music box cracklings, and turn the volume down way lower -- you’ve got yourself this pretty, soon-to-be-sleeping record.


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