Reasons to shop with us » 0113 245 4399

1 review »

Rhyton play spaced-out improvised music in a vaguely rockish idiom: bass, guitar and drums appear to be the set-up here. But Navigating By Starlight’s 2 side-long jams aren’t interested in sticking to any kind of grid, instead wandering all over the soundfield. Edition of 500 LPs on the MIE Music label.

  • LP £13.99
  • Sold out.
  • Shipping cost: n/a
  • NormanPoints: n/a
  • MIE 035
  • MIE 035 / LP on MIE Music in tip-on sleeve. Edition of 500 copies
  • Includes download code

Sold out. If you have recently ordered it and it is delayed, please check our order tracking tool for more information before trying to contact us.

SOLD OUT - Sorry

This one has sold out on all formats. Sorry! View them anyway?



Navigating By Starlight by Rhyton 1 review. Add your own review. 7/10
4 people love this record. Be the 5th!

7/10 Staff review, 31 May 2016

Space is the place, in moderation. There’s so much of it and I think it’s best consumed at a piecemeal pace: that’s why I’m all about being a living thing on a particular planet, because if I had all of the galaxy at once I think I’d stress out. All this agoraphobic chit-chat is to say that I’m glad space-rockers Rhyton have decided to release a 12” with just two blissed-out tunes: they do the trick of giving us this slow, echoing, hypnotic genre in vignette form, taking the kind of grandiose scope of Cosmic Ground and putting it into just two twenty minute tracks. In this universe, those are basically singles.

Zooming in and out of the void on “Lovejoy Vapor Trails”, the group offer a drumbeat that sounds absent-minded and forgotten, like little dots of information on an otherwise unmarked atlas. Guitars spend the first five minutes twiddling their proverbial thumbs, echoed and plucked but never quite tethered -- eventually the sonorous tempo abates and we get a ferocious rock freakout of post-rock climax proportions, which eventually gets pulled back a gear for some hard space rawkin’ worthy of Hendrix as the Doctor.

Flip it (on its axis, ‘cos this is space), and you’ll get “Skylla & Charybdis”, which is structured with a similar weirdness, led with slow serendipity by little guitar abstractions and twangs, thrown into a chill psychedelic workout before going ominous with oscillating half-riffs and an urgently driven bassline. Follow it through its many passages to the hell that is random prog sounds. Come out of the wormhole feeling sufficiently tripped. Go to the shop and buy an astronaut-themed cereal.


Get alerted to new stock from this artist / label.

Your email address will not be abused or shared.