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Folklore Tapes present a set of intriguing recordings based on the traditional English folklore of the Black Dog… Spoken spooky stories are mixed with uncanny sonic compositions for a deeply atmospheric work. This remarkable set consists of the LP, plus a DVD, a full-length booklet, posters and postcards… All in a fine embossed box. Limited to 500 copies.

  • LP box set £61.99
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  • FTOCI / Embossed, hand-numbered and hand-stamped box set on Follore Tapes including LP, DVD, 2x risograph posters, 80-page booklet and postcard. Edition of 500 copies
  • Includes download code

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Black Dog Traditions of England by Ian Humberstone, David Chatton Barker et al. 1 review. Add your own review. 8/10
9 people love this record. Be the 10th!

8/10 Staff review, 14 March 2016

"There's a black dog on my shoulder again", as the guy in Manic Street Preachers once sang, "licking my neck and saying he's my friend." Well, these black dogs - three of them and their stories are told here - and other occulturally inspired field recordings have absolutely nothing to do with Britpop; as you may have guessed. What we have here, is an intriguing and suitably spooky collection on vinyl lp and accompanying dvd, housed in a box alongside a detailed and lovingly illustrated book on the Black Dog Traditions of England and some nice prints. 

Ian Humberstone has done a fine job of curating and collating these tales -- recounted on the record and annotated in detail within the book -- and composing and playing and evoking just the right sort of crepuscular atmosphere where a legendary folkloric canine of a dark hue may just emerge from a shady corner... of a graveyard, or on a footpath in Cambridgeshire. Scary. "Tales of Black Shuck", as told by Malcolm Busby on the record, is hugely entertaining. Ian's winding and watery piano and synth shimmer underneath his voice.

The field recordings reveal clock gongs, toy piano coils, muted cymbals, chimes and tape loops and delay.  "The Barguest of Troller's Gill" is one such recording; the gentle sing-song trickle of a stream set against mutated domestic harp and saw frame prangs, with the caw of a crow for good measure. As I say, the stories are well worth a listen if you have even a passing interest in English folklore. The sounds and feelings beneath and between the tales are reminiscent of a Ghost Box / John Carpenter hybrid. Sounds good, huh?  

It all adds up to a very nice, beautifully presented package. I haven't seen the dvd.


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