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Earl Sweatshirt is an American rapper and member of hip-hop crew Odd Future who also include the notable artists Tyler, The Creator and Frank Ocean among their ranks. I Don't Like Shit, I Go Outside was Earl Sweatshirt’s second album and follow up to the critically acclaimed Doris. I Don't Like Shit, I Go Outside is being released on vinyl for the first time, so that you can hear Sweatshirt continue to develop and personalise his sound.


  • LP £18.99
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  • Shipping cost: £3.15 ?
  • NormanPoints: 190 ?
  • 88875069271 / LP on Odd Future / Columbia
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REVIEWS

I Don't Like Shit, I Don't Go Outside: An Album by Earl Sweatshirt by Earl Sweatshirt
1 review. Add your own review.
6 people love this record. Be the 7th!
8/10 Robin Staff review, 08 December 2015

On ‘I Don’t Like Shit’, Earl Sweatshirt has stopped trying on sounds and has started airing his shit out. A sombre record way the fuck removed from his days with OFWGTKA and his early mixtapes -- more personal and confessional than snide and confrontational -- this record rides onwards from the assured, laid-back but subtly devastated productions of ‘Doris’. Under the pseudonym of randomblackdude, Earl sublimates his beats and offers a liquid-lucid, almost ambient approach to production, keeping things off-kilter and curiously earnest, as if he were updating a Current Mood status to a sleepy emoji.

Perhaps more than ever, this Earl record flows, and that’s because it doesn’t try to: “Faucet” flows into “Grief” gorgeously, even though the latter suddenly builds up a wall of ambient sound for the beats to thwack against. Earl’s rapping, meanwhile, can transition between being properly sleeping -- uncaring, uncompromising, almost stream-of-consciousness sofa talk --  into a precise, stuttering delivery that feels wholly laboured over. With the curious, lethargic production by its side, it’s easy to get sucked into the homogenous world of ‘IDLS’, only to get chucked back out with a choice moment of syncopation. Earl sounds weary on this record, but it doesn’t make his record dull -- it invites further listens and a quieter space to scope it all out.


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