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The mighty Acid Mothers Temple, presently in a & The Melting Paraiso U.F.O. mood, here present Benzaiten, in which they grab hold of the contents of an Osamu Kitajima record and put them through their paces, jamming them to the outer limits in time-honoured Acid Mothers style. Double LP with Important Records.


Double LP £23.99 IMPREC425

2LP on Important Records. Edition of 1000 copies.

Sold out. If you have recently ordered it and it is delayed, please check our order tracking tool for more information before trying to contact us.

CD £12.99 IMPREC425CD

CD on Important Records.

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REVIEWS

Benzaiten by Acid Mothers Temple & the Melting Paraiso U.F.O.
1 review. Write a review for us »
7/10 Robin Staff review, 30 September 2015

Going under the most prominent of their five trillion name variants, Acid Mothers Temple & the Melting Paraiso UFO are currently wasting time covering old songs in all their glory and then several more glories. This version of Kawabata Makoto’s jam collective usually offers its most space-oriented strand of psychedelia, involving a healthy dose of galaxian Kosmische synth work -- but then rudely dousing it in the usual mix of string-bent acoustics and moon-howling riffs. As if their music couldn’t get any more contentedly irrelevant, ‘Benzaiten’ sees them do an unnecessarily monolithic cover of an Osamu Kitajima song, swirling in and out of its motifs in favour of their own jams.

AMT’s take on ‘Benzaiten’ proves to be standard fare longform psychedelia, Makoto leading his band towards the usual juxtaposition: a droopy-eyed and fairly bored rhythm section placate his own excitable guitar gobbles, which begin subtly and then erupt into rapidfire abstraction. Acoustic instruments offer some level of melody and the synths offer some level of a netherworld beyond all this, but both are ultimately laid to rest by Makoto’s indulgent soloing.

Makoto lets up as their homage to Kitajima does, and things take an ominous turn on our three-pronged second side, which essentially serves as one long act of minimalist and shrieking ambience, a kind of floss for the ears after all that stuff you got stuck in them for the twenty minutes prior. If you’re feeling lucky, go again for several riff-roaring reprises and addedums to ‘Benzaiten’, in which Makoto’s guitar sounds something like one of Schopenhauer’s incomprehensible philosophical tomes. Lovely wandering stuff: maybe go for a walk, get lost, start running in circles out of stress, then put this on.


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