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Named after one of the most renowned nineteenth century sorcerers who died mysteriously after being accused of causing deaths in rural Normandy, ‘Polyte Deshaies’ consists of four new tracks from psychedelic instrumentalists Les Sorciers Du Theil. The spontaneous sound is a powerfully meditative tapestry of repetitive rhythms, heavy guitars and unusual instruments.

  • 12" £9.99
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  • Tmd 008
  • Tmd 008 / 12" on Tamed Records. Edition of 300 copies

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Polyte Deshaies by Les Sorciers Du Theil 1 review. Add your own review. 8/10
6 people love this record. Be the 7th!

8/10 Staff review, 08 May 2015

Actually I think you’ll find that psych rock has the most seats in parliament. But whatever, BBC: I guess you don’t even care what Les Sorciers Du Theil have to say, a psych rock band obsessed with repetition of patterns and ever-so-slight modulations over a long period of time. Sound familiar? I should think so. Just offering you some topical commentary here today at Norman Records dot com. Get on my level, Nick Robinson.

The album art is a good idea of what you’re in for with this band of hobbyist krauters, who grin through a lot of symmetry and parallel-parked psych construction. They showboat, of course, with the odd outlandish drum fill, but ultimately they keep the rhythm steady, the chords crunchy and the axis spinning. These four longform pieces are gloriously patient, with “Trois Suspendus” serving as an instrumental introduction to “Le Gardien”, which has the band chanting for their freedom and cackling like sorcerers over endlessly repeated notes and a rhythm section who’ve forgotten their own sentience. If it doesn’t remind you of Swans, then I can’t help you, and frankly I don’t want to.

The second side whirs onward with a slow jam in “Hostie Noire”, where the band seem a lot sillier, firing out synth like they’ve just discovered a laser beam preset on a keyboard in the Year 7 music lesson from hell. Final track “Retour a Barnavast” lets a little doom low end in and brings back the chants for something both spectral and gruesomely earthy. A not so nice mix, overall, which is absolutely the point.



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