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Occupying the middle ground between Hammockesque echoing guitars and the captivating marching-speed drums of modern Britrock, Turtle’s second EP is a beautiful combination of atmospheric soundscaping and clever singer-songwriting. Colours is hypnotizing in its simultaneous largeness and beauty.


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Colours by Turtle
1 review. Write a review for us »
7/10 Robin Staff review, 14 May 2015

There’s been no shortage of indie rock chums making crystalline guitar records lately, of all shapes and hues; we’ve recently heard from Twerps and the Amazing, and we’re getting plenty of London Grammar idealists for whenever we need to feel humble. I am told people like the 1975 a lot, which is well: groove with your tunes, everyone. Clean music exists, is what I’m saying, and Turtle couldn’t be any sparklier.

Rather than sound like Tortoise but slightly different, Turtle predict that the best music ever would be if Chris Martin, full of ‘Ghost Stories’ sadness, listened to some electronica and did slightly more interesting things with guitar. Opener “Floor” takes placating riffing and mixes it in with beats and synth that sound almost on the periphery of EDM, a modest and forlorn dance stomp rerouting the song as it develops. “Silent Weapons” grows in volume, the band utilising harmonies worthy of Sufjan and guitar as anonymous and numbing as any British indie rock band that currently exists. It is a nice mix, and that’s all that matters.

The organ bluster that introduces “Lavender” is quickly replaced with nimble beats and vocals that have been streamlined through a vocoder. It's a pop experiment that recalls Jessie Ware’s “Still Love Me” on 'Devotion': on a record of what feels like formally structured pop songs, Turtle throw one in they just dig the sound of, hammering home the same vocal motif over shifting synths because it feels good. It’s their best song, without a doubt, though the rest of 'Colours' is a surprisingly dynamic thing: for a record that might sound panoramically bog-standard, there’s a good bit of discovering to do.


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