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Main man of The Oscillation, Demian Castellanos, has been exploring the furthest reaches of his electric guitar for decades, making private 4-track recordings from solitary bedroom sessions. The Kyvu Tapes Vol. 1 (1990-98) delve deep into this process, showing the world what Castellanos has been up to. On Cardinal Fuzz / Hands In The Dark.

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  • CFUL039
  • CFUL039 / Limited LP on Cardinal Fuzz / Hands In The Dark. Edition of 350 copies - Dude from The Oscillation

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The Kyvu Tapes Vol.1 (1990-98) by Demian Castellanos 1 review. Add your own review. 9/10
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9/10 Staff review, 13 May 2015

Mr. Oscillations himself, Demian Castellanos, has crafted something quite personal with ‘The Kyvu Tapes’. While it might seem like yet another downward spiral into the world of abstract psychedelia, Castellanos has named this record after an old house he used to live in back in his hometown of -- and this is not a joke -- Lizard. If you’re wondering how exactly he’s transposed any nostalgia onto this record that whirrs and whines and drones, then just know that Castellanos has always been a spooky experimental oppurtunist.

This record is full of chilling hints of what bedroom psych rock could be -- stripping away drums, rhythm and melody, he’s made a record of foggy and often abrasive ambient tones, mostly created with guitars and the occasional drum machine. The first side of this record sounds as if Jonas Munk has lost all sense of chill, or as if Castellanos has discovered a wormhole in his bedroom and recorded the noises made when he stands one half inside of his body inside of it. The layers of scarring ambient on “Timeslip” don’t sound homely, but they do sound lonely.

On the second side of the record, things get calmer, with “Afterthought” sounding like a gorgeous slice of scrapped psych pop a la Maston; guitars twinkling and abiding by the rules of lullaby. “Again” introduces shuffled beats to give some sense of direction to the noisy dread, while later on Castellanos crafts some textural bliss worthy of a Stars of the Lid album. Suffice to say: this is a diverse and immense volume of music that runs the full spectrum of a childhood: the fears and the joys, all rolled into one house that was home to every moment.



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