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Third full-length from New York’s compositional tricksters Ava Luna. Crisp production from Dave Friedman allows them to fully realise a sound they seem to have been searching for since the start. Soulful psychedelic funk with joyous crescendos and head-turning structures abound. Out on CD and vinyl LP from Western Vinyl.


LP £15.99 WEST136LP

LP on Western Vinyl.

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CD £9.99 WEST136CD

CD on Western Vinyl.

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REVIEWS

Infinite House by Ava Luna
1 review. Write a review for us »
9/10 Robin Staff review, 08 April 2015

Between their several hundred members, you could forgive Ava Luna for absorbing and then transmitting into orbit as many genres as they can: R&B, funk, stoner, psych rock, glitch, whatever sounds like pop music but totally, absolutely, categorically is not. This band have been known for their gleeful missteps and momentary hooks, refusing to stick to one motif and instead abstractly piecing together a bunch of brilliant ideas. Think Dirty Projectors, think Adult Jazz -- think Sun City Girls, a bit? Just have a good time, because the synths are gonna roll in, joy is gonna happen, we’re all going to groove.

Ava Luna haven’t toned down on their fluorescent wonderland since ‘Electric Balloon’, but their songs have become more overtly catchy. “Company” offers a total abandon of its initial structure for a halting slice of hard rock hallelujah. “Steve Polyester” takes on a spoken word narrative around Do Do Do hums and chill as fuck percussion -- plus a couple of fiery riffs to kiss it all off. Ava Luna always had the melodic streak to make all their high/no-minded nonsense work, and they show that in abundance on ‘Infinite House’, pulling off momentary, sweet-hearted melodies a la Grizzly Bear on “Roses & Cherries”.

“Billz” comes in at number one, blasting with brazen noise before retreating into slick, interlocked guitar licks and high-pitched vocal sighs. For a band this unbelievably slapdash and unexpected, it rolls by -- the slow, glass-smash psych freakout that rolls in feels like another way of uttering the same emotions expressed in those cries of “who’s gonna pay my bill?”. The whole thing sounds seamless, and though the rest of ‘Infinite House’ rarely sounds like that, it's always delightful.




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