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A supremely woozy outback Americana album from Robert Robinson. As a member of lo-fi psych-folkers Sore Eros, Robinson continues down the majestic, kaleidoscopic paths he’s become known for with flashes of glam and a certain melancholy at the heart of Connecticut River. Out on vinyl LP with download code from Feeding Tube Records. Limited to 300 copies.

  • LP £18.49
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  • FTR172LP
  • FTR172LP / LP on Feeding Tube Records. Edition of 300 copies
  • Includes download code

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Connecticut River by Robert Robinson 1 review. Add your own review. 8/10
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8/10 Staff review, 01 April 2015

He’s got an impossible tongue-twister of a name but I don’t care -- he’s my son, and I love him. Robert Robinson’s ‘Connecticut River’, is a testament to his love of adventuring in nature and absorbing its bizarre detours. While he’s motivated by pastoral folk music, New Age and primitivism, he also shows himself to be a keen listener to the indie rock romantics of old. His album is a surreal tapestry, but it always has a smile on its face and warm feelings at heart.

‘Connecticut River’ is as erratic as the work of Robinson’s psych-folk family Sore Eros, shifting between tunes that sound as inspired by John Fahey as they do by electronica, scorched-earth rockers like “Ziti” (which recalls Angel Olsen’s feral tunes on ‘Burn Your Fire’) and folk songs of a fractured Mount Eerie variety. Most of what Robinson plays sounds broken -- his picking on “Song for Popop” falls apart and then gets remade, and on “Chill Buds” he uses clattering, out of place synth to build a soft ambient march that quickly dissipates; think Tony Molina making serene post-rock.

There’s twang, too, but it’s taken out of Americana’s context, upended with beats and oozing guitar. Robinson uses these juxtapositions to distort our vision of the glorious countryside; the outback moves in and out of our peripheral vision, drawn into psychedelia and downbeat IDM, never quite allowed to be as pure as we imagine it. And yet Robinson’s music sounds totally intuitive; totally at peace with the contradictions.



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