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Bruno Nicolai conducted for soundtrack master Morricone from For A Few Dollars More and then many more pieces. He was also a composer in his own right, recording many soundtracks in the 1960s and 70s, almost becoming as prolific as his maestro. The soundtrack for The Red Queen Kills Seven Times is a first class example of his work in the giallo genre. On vinyl with exclusive artwork. Dagored.


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  • RED209 / Remastered 1972 Gialo score LP + poster on Dagored - First time on vinyl!

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La dama rossa uccide 7 volte (The Red Queen Kills Seven Times) by Bruno Nicolai
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7/10 Robin Staff review, 25 February 2015

Enino Morricone’s protege Bruno Nicolai occasionally got to step out of the conducting spotlight and compose his own works for the big screen, and ‘La Dama Rossa Uccide 7 Volte’, known in our shittier language as Red Queen Kills Seven Times, shows off his ability to write romantic, soft classical arrangements that set the mood for a seven-times-murderous painting of a queen (that’s as succinct a synopsis I can give of this film’s delightfully wacky premise).

Nicolai’s work seems to deliberate less than Morricone’s, though it is able to create the same tension with the taut aggression created by rising strings and climactic piano; he’s also able to mine a good sense of irony out of his compositions, with melodies that juxtapose his larger-than-life traditional scoring with an easy listening lounge aesthetic. Nicolai exchanges tones as if they can both contribute to the same chilling atmosphere -- he puts you at ease with the mutual understanding that blood and mayhem is to follow.

There’s a lot to take in here, with Nicolai writing momentary vignettes that fade away and then get re-emphasised in similar pieces, the film circling back on its constant stream of fear. It’s a convincingly melodramatic score for a film that couldn’t have dreamt up a more ridiculous idea for a thriller if it tried.


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