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The press release whilst poetic tells me fuck all about this release but what I can tell you from the track I'm listening to is that it is sounding utterly, utterly gorgeous. Late night twinkling atmospherics, kind of Japanesey sounding...ah it is on a Japanese label. Sounds like the type of thing Flau might put out. Beautiful atmospherics.   

  • CD £13.49
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  • WPMC014
  • WPMC014 / Japanese CD on White Paddy Mountain

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La estrella dormida by Federico Durand 1 review. Add your own review. 9/10
4 people love this record. Be the 5th!

9/10 Staff review, 21 October 2014

The Argentinean Federico Durand has never used drone as escapism. Where the genre might often be seen as isolating and lonely -- a genre for artists, not bands; a person, but never people -- Durand is always in company. On 'El libro de los árboles mágicos', he claims he was so comforted by the quaint village house his mother lived in that he was compelled to make a record in tribute to it, as if it had been by his side for the whole compositional process, a guiding force for the music as well as its muse. And while 'La Estrella Dormida' doesn't have a specific place or person uprooted next to it, it too sounds like the work of a man in tune with his world, totally in love with the sounds of nature and the reasons they get made. If you want dark ambient for your locked basement, look away; if you want someone to bring a lamplight and hang out with you down there, Durand's your man.

'La Estrella Dormida' isn't anything particularly special, in terms of its ambient touchstones. Durand takes soundscapers Stars of the Lid as his starting point, though he also recalls the natural bluster of Anne Guthrie and the dronework of acts like the Fun Years, who stretch their sustained notes to breaking point, until they eventually snap back like an elastic band. What's most interesting is the synthesis of this with a whole palate of secondary sounds: flashes of percussion that tinker like a bell ringing against a sparse landscape, and the whirring melodies that occasionally ricochet around the place, as if they've been caught in a dream catcher. Durand's ambient has the stillness of the genre, but brings people and their movements to it and makes the beauty a little more specific. 'La Estrella Dormida' is made special because of these moments -- the ones where we can hear Durand making sound, as well as using it up, like on "Caida Libra", where guitar notes flutter gracefully about the noise. Can drones be relatable? If so, Durand's are like rubbing your eyes at the prospect of a new morning.


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