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Martin Carr you may remember was the main songsmith in The Boo Radleys.  Responsible for some good early shoegazy work.....and then they did 'Wake up, Boo' didn't they? He then went on to do Brave Captain and is now solo. Why doesn't the other man do music? Y'know the one with the Terry Nutkins hair (before it sensibly got shaved off). Probably because Carr wrote all the songs. Anyway here he is doing some kinda fey chirpy indie pop with lots of electronics and synths barging into the mix. Harmonious stuff which will appeal to later era Boo Radleys.

Vinyl LP £18.49 TR288LP

LP + CD on Tapete.

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CD £13.49 TR288

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REVIEWS

The Breaks by Martin Carr
1 review. Write a review for us »
7/10 ReviewBot300 26 September 2014

Best known for being the singer/songwriter in the Boo Radleys, who started life as a decent shoegazey band before (with no small amount of success) making something a bit more punchy and immediate in the hunt for Britpop stardom, Martin Carr went on to put out his own records as bravecaptain (the name taken from a fIREHOSE song, oddly enough). Now 46, he's reverted to his real name for 'The Breaks'. Here he's knocking out some thoughtfully written indie rock with bold, bright arrangements which unsurprisingly do often sound quite a lot like Carr's previous band, tightly constructed and never more than six feet away from a catchy hook, taking in brass, electronics and some fine piano and organ parts courtesy of BAFTA-winning composer John Rae.

It's a little middle-of-the-road and often sounds like it's been plucked out of the mid-'90s, but Carr's large-scale but economical arrangements and personable lyrical style ensure that it's a consistently pleasant listen. In a melody that's weirdly similar to Burt Bacharach's 'Close to You', he croons "Here I am swimming in the mainstream, I tell my friends I'll subvert it from within" in 'Mainstream', while 'Senseless Apprentice' is all jagged guitars, fruity organ and wry references to Bullingdon boys and Boris bikes. 'The Breaks' is unlikely to win over those who weren't charmed by the Boo Radleys, but if you're a fan and want to see how he's matured and developed and a songwriter and arranger you might well think this is lovely.




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