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Holy Sons is Emil Amos, drummer for doom metal outfit Om and maker of bizarre, ill-defined folk music. Almost patriotically lo-fi, he's recorded thousands of songs and released them with a staunchly DIY ethos, echoing the practice of Mount Eerie's Phil Elverum but with even more dedication. 'Lost Decade II' is the second volume in his series that collects songs he's made on a 4-track while trawling through different basements and places in his home-state of North Carolina. 


  • Sheds & Shelters
  • I Can't Cross the Street
  • I Got Kicked Out of My Hometown
  • Let Me Give Up!
  • Hero Complex
  • If Its Lawless
  • Paul Knew
  • Move to Sweden
  • Kingdom Come
  • Altar in the Woods
  • Young Man

  • LP £16.99
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  • CPR-16
  • CPR-16 / LP on Chrome Peeler (Om, Grails, Lilacs & Champagne dude) on clear vinyl limited to 500. Sexy innit!

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Lost Decade II by Holy Sons 1 review. Add your own review. 8/10
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8/10 Staff review, 14 August 2014

Best known for his sterling drum work with the likes of Om, Grails and Jandek, Emil Amos turns troubadour here with some pretty varied genre-defying lo-fi psychedelic pop/folk/experimental business which brings to mind the likes of Microphones, MV/EE or Russell Hoke. It runs the gamut from sample-laden surrealist soundscapery to mumbly acoustic soul to rinky-dink synthpop to wonkily stumbling minimal Dead C-esque rock.

A collection of home recordings from between 1995 and 2002, 'Lost Decade II' flits around wildly through all manner of deconstructed pop and experimental psychedelic weirdness, every now and then diving into surprisingly catchy '60s pop territory but in such a sideways, meandering way that it's mutated into something else entirely. 'Kingdom Come' opens with crumbling guitar distortion, then there's some pretty much a capella DEVO-ish yelp'n'rant vocals along with a bouncy synth and drum machine putter, ending with some weird harmonised whine-drones. Head-scratching but enjoyable.


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