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America's most best record label dish up the goods again this week with this short but sweet album from slacker-indie trio Fat Creeps. There's two girls and a boy involved and it's the girls doing the singing with lots of sweetly naive girl group inspired harmonies, and they squeeze ten songs full of punchy hooks and dreamy vibes onto this 45rpm LP.   Sound-wise they remind me a lot of La L ...

LP £13.99 SL065

LP on Sophomore Lounge.

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Must Be Nice by Fat Creeps
2 reviews. Write a review for us »
9/10 Mike Staff review, 17 July 2014
America's most best record label dish up the goods again this week with this short but sweet album from slacker-indie trio Fat Creeps. There's two girls and a boy involved and it's the girls doing the singing with lots of sweetly naive girl group inspired harmonies, and they squeeze ten songs full of punchy hooks and dreamy vibes onto this 45rpm LP.   Sound-wise they remind me a lot of La Luz's vocal-led tracks, a similar laid back and detached delivery, but with a bit more post-grungey kick to the guitars than that ensemble's hazy surf-ish sound...there's even hints of Hole on tracks like 'Daydreaming', but tempered by a casual, louche ease that's more like The Breeders or early Best Coast, and often a post-punky sonic economy that makes me think of Shopping or the Delta 5. This is real good stuff, wry and tightly written and over too quickly. Definitely a name to look out for.  
7/10 Jim Staff review, 17 July 2014

This Boston based three piece have been touted in certain circles as a band to watch and on the the strength of this, their debut LP on Sophomore Lounge, its easy to see why. The band play lively, hook driven indie-rock in the vein of The Breeders/ Pixies combined with some sweet, layered dream-pop vocals from bassist Mariam Saleh and guitarist Gracie Jackson.

It’s clear from their name and their generally breezy approach that they don’t take themselves too seriously. Nevertheless, the real jewels in this collection of songs are the moodier, darker numbers: like ‘He Comes In Loudly’, which almost reminds me of Come with its sneary melancholy and tough minor key breakdowns; or the languid jangle-pop of ‘In Name Only’, with its shades of The Smiths being fronted by Kim Gordon (if she was able to sing in tune!). It’s not a terribly original record but the band exudes a ‘who gives a shit’ attitude that makes their bittersweet college rock all the more enjoyable.


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