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1 review »I’ve not seen ‘The Brown Bunny’ and it’s unlikely I ever will as I can’t deal with Vincent Gallo. I know he means well and obviously watching The Bunny Brown would be preferable to sitting through insufferable bullshit like the new Godzilla remake but it’s just not for me. Fortunately Gallo is a genuine music aficionado so his soundtracks are as appealing, if no ... »

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  • TSUN103LP
  • TSUN103LP / 180g vinyl LP in tip-on gatefold sleeve. Edition of 1000 copies

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The Brown Bunny by Various
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5 people love this record. Be the 6th!
8/10 Li'l Biz Staff review, 23 May 2014

I’ve not seen ‘The Brown Bunny’ and it’s unlikely I ever will as I can’t deal with Vincent Gallo. I know he means well and obviously watching The Bunny Brown would be preferable to sitting through insufferable bullshit like the new Godzilla remake but it’s just not for me. Fortunately Gallo is a genuine music aficionado so his soundtracks are as appealing, if not more appealing than his actual films.

The A-side of ‘The Bunny Brown’ OST features five compositions by various artists poached from the archives beginning with the beautiful folksie jam ‘Come Wander With Me’ by Jeff Alexander (with vocals from Bonnie Beecher) that originally featured in an episode of The Twilight Zone and followed by a couple of tasteful jazz pieces from Ted Curson and Francesco Accardo plus ‘Beautiful’ by Gordon Lightfoot and the excellent ‘Milk And Honey’ by Jackson C. Frank. Good start.

The B-side is exclusively John ‘Under The Bridge’ Frusciante’s space and features five original compositions that act as the incidental pieces in the film and again, it’s pretty much all good with five stripped back pieces showcasing Frusciante’s guitar virtuosity and his knack for whimsical song writing. Instrumental pieces ‘Prostitute Song’ and ‘Falling’  particularly impress with the Fru shredding like nobody's business whilst maintaining a folksie charm you might expect from Paul Giovanni’s Wicker man soundtrack or perhaps Steve Reich’s ‘Electric Counterpoint’.


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