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Those lovely people at the Fuzz Club have sent us this platter of crunchy psychedelic spacekraut by Eindhoven's Radar Men From The Moon and it's on very snazzy looking black and white splatter vinyl. Once you stop staring at it and put it on your record player you get to hear the trio cutting loose with some cosmic rock which moves from patient repeato-grooves to ferocious distorto-rawk - when the ...

LP £15.99 FC015V12LP

Black w/white splatter vinyl LP on Fuzz Club..

  • Includes download code.
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Strange Wave Galore by Radar Men From The Moon
1 review. Write a review for us »
9/10 ReviewBot300 Staff review, 14 March 2014

Those lovely people at the Fuzz Club have sent us this platter of crunchy psychedelic spacekraut by Eindhoven's Radar Men From The Moon and it's on very snazzy looking black and white splatter vinyl. Once you stop staring at it and put it on your record player you get to hear the trio cutting loose with some cosmic rock which moves from patient repeato-grooves to ferocious distorto-rawk - when they hit full steam ahead on album centrepiece 'The Sweet Confusion' there's a wind-tunnel density to their sound which brings to mind The Heads at their most dirty and repetitive. To me this is a good thing, and even more so when the drums drop out and the song disintegrates into a wash of My Bloody Valentine wibblegaze.

In a way it's fairly straightforward; only bass, drums and guitar are listed on the sleeve, it's spacerock with emphasis on the rock, and the machine-like unison of the three players is impressive. Like when they lock into a delay pedal twinkle-chug groove with lots of clever shifts in 'Opaque' there's a kind of Poison Arrowsish paranoid adrenaline to it as it weaves inexorably towards its tractor-bass finale. It's like space rock for people with short attention spans, despite its repetitive krautrock leanings it's fast-paced and immediate and unashamedly fun in places.

Album closer 'What The Lightning Said' ends with a really audaciously cheesy uplifting chord sequence that's got a fist-pumping '80s vibe, total power-rock of the kind that many psych bands would take themselves too seriously to even consider, building it up and up until it's a cacophony of spluttering guitar fuzz and sheet-metal feedback. And it works, it's like a giant whirlwind of high-fives. The funnest space rock record so far this year.


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