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You may remember Tom from Leaf Records artist A Small Good Thing, now out on his own and creating some very interesting music. This latest album on Loophamystery Records begins by leading you into a false sense of security. The soft pluck of acoustic guitar ‘Signal’ could easily be a Jethro Tull album track but then what follows is all manner of strangeness. Twisted folk and weirdy be ...

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REVIEWS

One Shapeless Day by Tom Fazzini
3 reviews. Write a review for us »
6/10 Ian Staff review, 12 December 2013

You may remember Tom from Leaf Records artist A Small Good Thing, now out on his own and creating some very interesting music.

This latest album on Loophamystery Records begins by leading you into a false sense of security. The soft pluck of acoustic guitar ‘Signal’ could easily be a Jethro Tull album track but then what follows is all manner of strangeness. Twisted folk and weirdy beardy prog madness with narration and tripped out storytelling, the instrumentation is pretty minimal with the occasional acoustic guitar and violin but for the most part the narration takes centre stage. Musically it really reminds me of early Peter Gabriel: that mix of melodic post-prog/post-punk with the addition of almost schizophrenic rambling and strange noises.

Overall, ‘One Shapeless Day’ is really hard to pin down. A bit mixed up and some of it hardly there at all, but an interesting sound whatever you want to call it.


10/10 Eileen Shaw Customer review, 14th May 2014

A frieze of existential effects, an absurdist touch, as if Dali had a hand in it The stories are about Nuck, who comes to a grizzly end, his head rolling down a roof, having been prized off in handfuls. The songs are weirdly beautiful, having much to do with riffs on legs, heads, village scenes, students pushing each other into hedges, breaking through to find a paradise of asphodel. In another scenario we are taken to Fylingdales, the American listening station – advancing like a great ship, tuneful feedback wonderfully echoing to the stars and coming back empty. The golfball significance, the bizarre tale of two dogs, told by a child. The Scottish in Tom Fazzini’s background breaks through with older voices, from the past, and only faintly present but redolent with meaning. More of Nuck, then, who feels Russian in his post-office coat. There are many such touches in this lyrical smorgasboard, delightful, eccentric, insistent. A too-short sequence of bagpipes, underlined by emphatic chords. There are mouth-trumpet episodes as if calling to anti-war, up-staging the hint of militarism, mocking the thought of war in a white-noise episode in space. In the end, it seems to say, cancel it, then explore the inner workings of the world. Who is Maya Deren, who gets a reprise, surely an important, a lost love, a mambo queen way back when, with a voice like Lucille Ball? Her skull is a drum, nothing inside, but reverberation. Then we get more of Dave Coxon’s fabulous monologues as he tells us of “the good spirit”, the twins who get religion, a thread moving between the strangers, postcards swallowed by blackness, if not written in paranoid green ink. What’s inside the castle on wheels? Pieces of you all over the floor One shapeless morning, Dave Coxon demonstrates removals, dentistry, a talent for vacuum extraction, A woman recites in outer space, her voice turning to a crowing of rooks. Songs that wait to strike.


10/10 tom fazzini Customer review, 14th December 2013

j. tull, p. gabriel..prog.. got to be kidding me! Definately no reference points of mine, sooner nail my anatomy to the floor ha ha



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