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DJ Spider & Marshallito are no strangers, having corroborated on several records. However, they team up for their first outing on Will Bankhead’s The Trilogy Tapes label for four tracks of wonky, intriguing techno. Each of the record’s tracks takes its name from a chemical compound, ...

12" £9.99 TTT011

12" on The Trilogy Tapes.

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REVIEWS

Deadly Structures EP by DJ Spider and Marshallito
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7/10 RMCC Customer review, 11th August 2015

DJ Spider & Marshallito are no strangers, having corroborated on several records. However, they team up for their first outing on Will Bankhead’s The Trilogy Tapes label for four tracks of wonky, intriguing techno.

Each of the record’s tracks takes its name from a chemical compound, and we begin with "C17H21NO2". The track begins with a steady raising bass pulse and off-kilter string-like synths. As the track progresses, the percussion takes on a much more natural feel, with hand played bongos and off-beat hi-hat snaps giving the track and uneasy framework. The track then moves on, leaving the bass behind, and allowing the pitter-patter of synths to take centre stage. It’s certainly a start which will leave you a little taken-aback.

Next, "C17H21NO4" properly kicks the record into gear, with sharp bursts of synths and more erratic percussion. This time around, there’s an echoed vocal sample breathing more life into the track. Again, it’s a claustrophobic affair, though this one’s more of a good kind of pain. On the B – Side, "CH2FCF3" arrives with more purpose still. Heavy drums clatter along accompanied by more sinister synths and snippets of vocal. Synth drones add to the uneasy feel of the piece.

Finally, "C16H21NO3" sees the record out by beginning with the strangest swing-style drum pattern. However, this quickly comes into focus, and starts to make sense, when the jittering synth stabs arrive. It’s a slow builder, and uses much of the same tools to create a track which is more playful that its predecessors, though retains a familiarity and that just-so-slightly sinister feel.

Over, the record impresses in a number of ways. The most prominent is its cohesion. Whilst each track is different, there’s an obvious theme throughout, making this a proper whole rather than just 4-tracks on one slab of wax. A decent listen, and worth a punt.

As ever, the artwork from TTT is outstanding.



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