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1 review | 5 people love this record: be the 6th! Sometimes you wonder if they are all just taking the piss. It’s hard to know whether this is a genuine Arctic Monkeys single or the kind of parody Hale and Pace used to always finish their half hour ‘comedy’ shows with. The first track is called ‘Why’d You Only Call Me When You’re High’, a title mirroring Pet Shop Boys’ ‘You Only Tell Me You Lo ... »

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Why'd You Only Call Me When You're High? by Arctic Monkeys
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5 people love this record. Be the 6th!
7/10 Clinton Staff review, 30 August 2013

Sometimes you wonder if they are all just taking the piss. It’s hard to know whether this is a genuine Arctic Monkeys single or the kind of parody Hale and Pace used to always finish their half hour ‘comedy’ shows with. The first track is called ‘Why’d You Only Call Me When You’re High’, a title mirroring Pet Shop Boys’ ‘You Only Tell Me You Love Me When You’re Drunk’.

As a track it does the job without reaching the dizzy heights of previous surprisingly good effort ‘Do I Wanna Know’. It’s slinky and slightly funky with a severe dearth of guitars, it’s heavily produced by James Ford so it sounds more like him and his highfalutin ways than a grimy garage band from Sheffield. It’s saved - as are a lot of their songs - by Alex Turner’s voice which is as distinctive and elastic as ever. Oddly, halfway through he changes the word ‘call’ to ‘phone’. I demand to know why.

The B side...is called...wait for it...’Stop The World (I Want To Get Off With You)’. Terrible...no...brilliant...no...I can’t decide. The song exactly mirrors the A side in that the verse builds up then leaves a gap before the ‘punchline’ of the chorus and that Matt Helder’s strangely high-pitched backing vocals are prominent AND that it’s as scrubbed as a new potato. It’s kind of like they’ve written the same song twice (naysayers may say that it’s been a lot more than twice) but it’s strangely subdued and especially lyrically from the highbrow newspapers favourite northern poet, perhaps suggesting that there is more to write about in Lowfield than Los Angeles.


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