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Eat Lights Become Lights have been working away for years at their krautrock/post-rock/electronica hybrid with consistently decent results, and their persistence has been rewarded as their last LP sold out pretty sharpish and this new one has got a vinyl pressing on Great Pop Supplement in fancy stripy coloured vinyl (and Rocket Girl on CD). This time they’ve gone full kosmische kraut a lot ...

CD £9.99 RGIRL96

CD on Rocket Girl.

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LP £9.99 GPS107

Coloured vinyl LP on The Great Pop Supplement. Edition of 500 copies.

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REVIEWS

Modular Living by Eat Lights Become Lights
1 review. Write a review for us »
8/10 ReviewBot300 Staff review, 09 July 2013

Eat Lights Become Lights have been working away for years at their krautrock/post-rock/electronica hybrid with consistently decent results, and their persistence has been rewarded as their last LP sold out pretty sharpish and this new one has got a vinyl pressing on Great Pop Supplement in fancy stripy coloured vinyl (and Rocket Girl on CD).

This time they’ve gone full kosmische kraut a lot more than we’ve heard from them before, too, easing off from the post-rocky build ups and chaotic climaxes for a more pumping electronic hypno-grooves and relying more heavily on synthesizers to carry the melodies, although the guitars are still present, and particularly effective in the eight-minute hazy tropical slowie ‘Rowley Way Overlook’ alongside some great wibbly library synth tones and distant, drifting vocal loops, taking the listener on a brief excursion to a tropical paradise.

Then the languid vibes get a bit more futuristic and kosmische with the swirling synths and treated vocals of ‘Los Feliz to Griffith’ and ‘Life In The Sprawl’ - this diversion into ambient territory comes as a surprise but fits nicely onto the album as ‘Chiba Prefecture’ brings us back to the beatier material with a bit of shimmering grooves like Jonas Munk covering a Cave song and we’re back into bright, bouncy, beat-driven krautrock from here on in, until a sea of shivering peace drones see us out in ‘Habitat ‘67’ in a flood of Cloudland Canyon-esque uplift. A more mature record than previously, then, with heavier reliance on their kraut and ambient influences. Very good.




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