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Here, finally, is the debut full-length from the acclaimed duo Public Service Broadcasting, who build accessible post-rocky pop instrumentals around archival samples from wartime broadcasts and public information films. The tracks remind me of a more concise, less intense Death In Vegas crossed with that Baz Luhrmann ‘Everybody’s Free...’ number and maybe a touch of (this android ...

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REVIEWS

Inform - Educate - Entertain by Public Service Broadcasting
2 reviews. Write a review for us »
8/10 ReviewBot300 Staff review, 01 May 2013

Here, finally, is the debut full-length from the acclaimed duo Public Service Broadcasting, who build accessible post-rocky pop instrumentals around archival samples from wartime broadcasts and public information films. The tracks remind me of a more concise, less intense Death In Vegas crossed with that Baz Luhrmann ‘Everybody’s Free...’ number and maybe a touch of (this android’s PSB of choice) the Pet Shop Boys’ more lighthearted moments - bouncy rhythms and likeably melodic tunes offset by these unsettlingly nostalgic transmissions which range from the familiar - ‘Night Mail’’s Auden sample is so iconic its inclusion seems almost audacious - to the, er, less familiar.

A particular highlight for me is the surging and skewed rock’n’roll of ‘Signal 30’, mixing scary road safety messages with a bone-cracking guitar based instrumental a la late-era Man Or Astro-Man?. In contrast ‘The Now Generation’ is largely synth based, finding a funky sweet spot in between Fourtet and early Depeche Mode which bursts into technicolour M83 style ‘80s overdrive towards the end. It’s all very slickly done, and from what I’ve heard about their audio-visual live spectaculars I bet they’re a riot to watch. My one concern is that after hearing an EP which was much the same formula, by the time I get to this album I’ve pretty much had my fill of the uplifting-indie-dance-instrumental-with-wartime-samples schtick, which was at its most effective in a smaller dose on their debut EP. I can’t imagine how they could possibly continue to make it work for another album, but this is pretty solid stuff, likeable and unobtrusive; good for long drives and background music when you’ve got friends over who don’t really like music.


9/10 Stuart Customer review, 9th January 2014

why should a man listen to Inform Educate Entertain? because it is there...(to copy, rip off, paraphrase the end of 'Everest') you'll sort of think you've heard this done before, recorded public service broadcasts, documentaries, spoken word information all put over a devilishly catch electro pop beat that will have you humming along many hours after you've heard the track. it is good 80s style disco pop fodder but done far more cleverly interestingly and stylishly than you'd expect. it could have been very poor, but it is actually glorious throughout with good use of a variety of interests throughout (trumpets, synths) - you will keep going back to it I promise!




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