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I first came across William Ryan Fritch through a remarkable track he contributed to the bonus CD on the recent Yuri Lugovskoy album. I had no previous idea that he made such a beautiful sound. He is a composer and multi instrumentalist out of Oakland and if he continues to work to this standard I am in no doubt he will reach a far wider audience. The album is a stunning combination of haunting ne ...

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The Waiting Room (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) by William Ryan Fritch
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9/10 Clinton Staff review, 22 March 2013

I first came across William Ryan Fritch through a remarkable track he contributed to the bonus CD on the recent Yuri Lugovskoy album. I had no previous idea that he made such a beautiful sound. He is a composer and multi instrumentalist out of Oakland and if he continues to work to this standard I am in no doubt he will reach a far wider audience. The album is a stunning combination of haunting neoclassical strings, tempered with burbling electronica to create perfect wet weather soundtrack music.

This CD is a recording of Fritch’s soundtrack to Pete Nick’s fascinating sounding film ‘The Waiting Room’ about Oaklands Highland Hospital. Oddly, three tracks in, the aforementioned Lugovskoy piece appears in a slightly different format. It’s just as haunting as I remembered with gorgeous staccato strings and piano twinkles. It reminds me of the best work of Ryuichi Sakamoto. There is always the element of electronic underpinning the organic instruments, tracks regularly fade out to bubbly electronics but it’s all naturally done.

‘Light in The Dark Hour’ stuns, tremendous Philip Glass like staccato keys are joined by wonderful swooping strings and hammered drums coming across like all the best bits of Rachel’s all rolled into one.  There are some post rock dynamics at play too; ‘What Are You Waiting For’ combines drums with picked, isolated guitars and vibraphone while ‘Last Line Of Defense’ utilises picked acoustics and heavily reverbed piano and guitar to create a brooding atmosphere piece. The album is extremely versatile and leagues ahead of any of the ‘neoclassical’/soundtrack type stuff I have heard of late. Gorgeous shimmering compositions that deserve your attention. Highly Recommended.




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