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So far in review corner today it’s just been a constant stream of drone, ambient and experimental offerings, so it’s very pleasant to finally have reached an album which has, you know, songs on it which are sung by singers and played on instruments. My immediate reaction to the opening track ‘Cheek Mountain’ is that it reminded me of a cross between Tunng and Erland Cooper ...

Vinyl LP £14.99 FTH147LP

Heavyweight vinyl LP + download on Full Time Hobby (chap from Tunng).

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CD £8.99 FTH147CD

CD on Full Time Hobby (Chap from Tunng).

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REVIEWS

Cheek Mountain Thief by Cheek Mountain Thief
1 review. Write a review for us »
9/10 ReviewBot300 09 August 2012

So far in review corner today it’s just been a constant stream of drone, ambient and experimental offerings, so it’s very pleasant to finally have reached an album which has, you know, songs on it which are sung by singers and played on instruments. My immediate reaction to the opening track ‘Cheek Mountain’ is that it reminded me of a cross between Tunng and Erland Cooper (of ‘and the Carnival’ fame)’s triumphant recent Magnetic North album, so it’s no surprise to discover that Tunng’s Mike Lindsay is the man responsible for all this.

As with his previous band the instrumentation borrows from indie and folk schools indiscriminately and freely, and the vocal delivery tends towards nonchalant restraint although at one point in ‘Showdown’ he’s going all out with some strained yelping. I feel like the quirkiness gets a little bit Mighty Boosh in places, such as the wonky hypno-pop of ‘Strain’, but it’s all superbly executed and the ideas keep on coming. When he introduces brass in songs like ‘Snook Pattern’ I can’t help but be reminded of Beirut too, and of course this whole arranged pastoral indie style owes a massive debt to the Divine Comedy so it wouldn’t be fair to leave them unmentioned.

Even though they’re using quite traditional instrumentation this never feels like a record that’s stuck in the past. The matter-of-fact northern vocals have a bit of a Hood-esque feel to them sometimes but the music is lusher and less understated. Just charming and accomplished pastoral indie pop with tasty orchestral flourishes that fans of his previous band will no doubt lap up.




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