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There are enough obscure indie/electronica demi-luminaries on here to fell a horse, featuring as it does Andrew Johnson (Hood/Remote Viewer), Chris Adams (Hood, Bracken), Craig Tattersall (The Boats, Remote Viewer, Hood) and Paul Dorrington (Wedding Present). What emerges are two slabs of electronic pop that are forward looking in the production values yet blatantly in thrall to the great and good ...

Vinyl 7" £5.99 moteer::019

2nd in series of clear vinyl 7"'s from Hood/ Remote Viewer people on Moteer.

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9/10 Clinton Staff review, 13 October 2011

There are enough obscure indie/electronica demi-luminaries on here to fell a horse, featuring as it does Andrew Johnson (Hood/Remote Viewer), Chris Adams (Hood, Bracken), Craig Tattersall (The Boats, Remote Viewer, Hood) and Paul Dorrington (Wedding Present). What emerges are two slabs of electronic pop that are forward looking in the production values yet blatantly in thrall to the great and good of independent musics rich history. The result is something akin to what would happen if The Field Mice signed to Hyperdub.  Side A (there are no titles) starts in spectacular fashion with crunchy electronics, smart vocals and glistening guitars conjuring up that rarely heard midway point between Autechre and The Orchids. The song then veers off into several pleasant musical cul de sacs taking in a Peter Hook bass solo and some Bobby Wratten heartbreak along the way yet frustratingly doesn't quite live up to its stunning opening salvo. On the flip the conventional yet pretty opening guitar strums and vocals recall The Field Mice in their 'For Keeps' pomp but the song only comes to life with a sky scraping blast of digi-gaze (yep, I just invented that) with Bobby Gillespie-era Jesus and Mary Chain pounding snare, whistling feedback and heavily effected vocals. The record fits perfectly into the current vogue for retro indie fetishism, referencing Sarah Records, The Smiths and New Order along the way but you'd also be justified in filing it alongside your modern day Darkstar, Postal Service and early M83 discs.


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