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Compared to the thrillingly mournful songwriting of Charlie Parr, this album by Glenn Jones sounds rather one-dimensional. He has his schtick and that's drifting expansive solo guitar explorations that sound almost exactly like John Fahey. You could also compare the 12 string meanderings to those of the late Jack Rose. It comes as almost a relief that by track three he has picked up a banjo an ...

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REVIEWS

The Wanting by Glenn Jones
2 reviews. Write a review for us »
6/10 Clinton Staff review, 09 September 2011

Compared to the thrillingly mournful songwriting of Charlie Parr, this album by Glenn Jones sounds rather one-dimensional. He has his schtick and that's drifting expansive solo guitar explorations that sound almost exactly like John Fahey. You could also compare the 12 string meanderings to those of the late Jack Rose. It comes as almost a relief that by track three he has picked up a banjo and carries on his merry way. I like these kind of dusty, solo compositions that evoke 1930's America, they are excellently played and atmospheric in the extreme but you start to wonder how much of this stuff you actually need, particularly when its not bringing anything new or innovative to the genre. Others would argue that this is not the point, it's just a re-creation/extension of what Fahey took from the old country bluesmen and it's perfectly valid.


9/10 Tim Smith-Laing Customer review, 28th October 2016

Glenn Jones is probably still best known as a disciple of John Fahey, and friend/fellow-traveler with the late and very lamented Jack Rose. He's much more than that, though. To say he's a distinctive guitarist in his own right is an understatement. The lineage traces directly to Fahey, of course, but Jones is much, much more than simple a Faheyite retreading old ground. In fact, Rose lived much more fully in Fahey's shadow than Jones does.

The tunes on this album shimmer and shine with a kind of light-hearted melancholy that is a paradoxical as it sounds, and which is all Jones' own. Guitarists will appreciate the technical side of things - Jones is fond of counter-intuitive alternative tunings and using partial capos (all detailed in the liner notes, with an invitation to drop him a line for more details) - but there is nothing remotely showy about Jones' playing. It's all in the service of tunes that are about as expressive and beautiful as fingerpicking gets. For my money, this album is a minor masterpiece.




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