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More Felt Re-issues

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Well they couldn't just leave it at the first half of their career could they? Now that our appetite has been whetted, Cherry Red now present the second batch of Felt re-issues which includes marvellous albums such as 'Poem of the River' and 'The Pictorial Jackson Review' all in a choice of luxury CD editions of vinyl re-presses.

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Felt
Forever Breathes The Lonely Word

The first Felt album for Creation and the first not to feature guitar wizard Maurice Deebank. Forever Breathes the Lonely Word is kind of a bridge album between their old sound and the lighter more varied work in the second half of the eighties. As a result of Deebank's departure Martin Duffy's organ takes centre stage, wanderin...view item »

Felt
Poem Of The River

For anyone that thinks all the best Felt stuff came in the first part of their career you need to hear Poem of the River. This is a glorious low key album full of glistening guitars and Lawrence's whispered vocals. Six lovely songs including career highlights Stained Glass Windows in the Sky and Dark Red Birds. Utterly essential...view item »

Felt
Train Above The City

Possibly one of the strangest albums ever made in that Felt leader Lawrence is nowhere to be seen and instead of their usual arty indie-pop you get an album of jazzy instrumentals composed by keyboardist Martin Duffy and drummer Gary Ainge. Musically it bears no resemblance to anything else they've ever done but still fits in wi...view item »

Felt
Me And A Monkey On The Moon

The final Felt album saw the band go out on a rather sombre and perhaps disjointed note on an album that somewhat lacked the distinctive creativity of their previous work. That said it shows a hitherto unseen maturity with a slight country-ish feel and is notable by the appearance of pedal steel player B J Cole. ...view item »

Felt
The Pictorial Jackson Review

The Pictorial Jackson Review is not only brilliantly titled but is one of the best of the latter day Felt records. It's full of wonderfully brief tunes which more often than not sound comically in thrall to Bob Dylan. Try listening to How Spook Got Her Man without thinking of the grizzled troubadour. ...view item »