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Albums of the Year 2013

Year of the Austerity Dog. These New Puritans started over, Blixa Bargeld turned crooner, Oneohtrix Point Never invented the future, and Parquet Courts introduced themselves. Also My Bloody Valentine actually finished something.
1. Album Of The Year!

Sleaford Mods
Austerity Dogs

Austerity Dogs is the 6th album by Nottingham duo Sleaford Mods, but it’s the one that got them noticed. Since its release in 2013, the band have gone from strength to strength, being a necessary mouthpiece and cathartic outlet for many in the these austere times. They mix a punk snarl with pepped-up hip-hop beats and socially aware lyrics to make an original, energetic, angry and often witty statement that has become essential.
2.

Hookworms
Pearl Mystic

This is the 'classic' debut album Leeds psych man band Hookworms. They purvey a kind of heads down, no nonsense kraut boogie which borrows as much from Neu '3' as it does Status Quo 'On the Level'. Moving way into the modern age, it's the kind of album no Spacemen 3 fan should be without. Heavy psych wibbling for all the family.  
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Grouper
The Man Who Died In His Boat

Originally released in 2013, this album was recorded by Liz Harris alongside her best-known work, Dragging a Dead Deer Up a Hill. It’s in the same stylistic ballpark - ethereal, heavily reverbed electric guitar and vocals with dark and mysterious undercurrents, sometimes swimming into clearer focus when Harris switches to acoustic. Out of print for a while and now back on CD.
20.

Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds
Push The Sky Away

You've heard him repeatedly on Peaky Blinders so if you haven't already caught up with Nick Cave's sixteen or so studio albums with his Bad Seeds then there's no time like the present. Push the Sky Away was his 2013 album which showed that time had withered none of his songwriting and arrangement skills. It's a slow moving record of stripped down songs and heartfelt paeans somewhat at odds perhaps with the more brutal landscapes of his records earlier in the decade but showcasing the more introspective side of his oeuvre.   
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